lottereinigerforever:

Elliott Gould on the set of “The Long Goodbye”

lottereinigerforever:

Elliott Gould on the set of “The Long Goodbye”

That a cross may crush me if I refuse to believe in it. That I may rock anchor through the ages if I hope it’s not true. That the host may choke me if I beneighbor you without my charity! Sh! Shem, you are. Sh! You are mad!
The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.
But mostly I just stand in the dark field,
in the middle of the world, breathing —
They talk about realism, Laurie thought, […] as if only the outside were real.
beatonna:

King Baby says No
I’ll be honest here, I don’t know if the proper word is Lay or Lie

beatonna:

King Baby says No

I’ll be honest here, I don’t know if the proper word is Lay or Lie

Following Ferguson: Teaching the Crisis in the Classroom - COLORLINES
Georgetown professor Marcia Chatelain used Twitter to put together a #FergusonSyllabus for teachers looking for resources for their classrooms. The list Chatelain compiled at TheAtlantic.com, which includes history, fiction, children’s books and academic works, is a great resource for more than just students and their teachers. Chatelain’s ask was that her fellow educators commit to discussing Ferguson in their first days of class, and share resources with students and each other to help sort through the last few weeks of trauma, confusion and race dialogue. “Some of us will talk about Ferguson forcefully, others gingerly, but from preschool classrooms to postdoctoral seminars, Ferguson is on the syllabus,” Chatelain wrote. Conversation sparked by #FergusonSyllabus inspired this resource guide for educators, too.

nevver:

Happy Hour, The 99-Pack

Uh, guys. Guys.

veganvibez:

found the best twitter 

Laurie kept his hand on the book covering the title. In his imagination the pages were printed not with their own paragraphs only, but with all that he himself had brought to them: it seemed as though he must be identified and revealed in them, beyond all pretense of detachment, as if they were a diary to which he had committed every secret of his heart.

SLYTHERIN APPRECIATION WEEK → day five » favourite dynamic between two slytherins 
↳ Bellatrix Black and Narcissa Black

whoaaaa I love Eva Green as young Bellatrix.

I read in a poem:
to talk is divine.
But the gods don’t speak:
they make and unmake worlds
while men do the talking.
They play frightening games
without words.
There is only one kind of shock worse than the totally unexpected: the expected for which one has refused to prepare.