In unwittingly destroying the artificial but time-honored distinction between natural and human histories, climate scientists posit that the human being has become something much larger than the simple biological agent that he or she always has been. Humans now wield a geological force. […] In that sense, we can say that it is only very
recently that the distinction between human and natural histories—much of which had been preserved even in environmental histories that saw the two entities in interaction— has begun to collapse. For it is no longer a question simply of man having an interactive relation with nature. This humans have always had, or at least that is how man has been imagined in a large part of what is generally called the Western tradition. Now it is being claimed that humans are a force of nature in the geological sense. A fundamental assumption of Western (and now universal) political thought has come undone in this crisis.
humansofnewyork:

Just two baby monkeys hugging.
(Kathmandu, Nepal)

humansofnewyork:

Just two baby monkeys hugging.

(Kathmandu, Nepal)

ohfuckyeahcillianmurphy:

Mirror Mirror on the Wall | Cillian Murphy | So It Goes | Behind the Scenes Extras

when we speak we are afraid / our words will not be heard / nor welcomed / but when we are silent / we are still afraid / So it is better to speak / remembering / we were never meant to survive.
lensblr-network:

To race with the winds.
by gawlak.tumblr.com

lensblr-network:

To race with the winds.

(Source: -teesa-)

Paul Seawright, Invisible Cities series.

From “Exception to the Norm: Representations of Urban Africa in Paul Seawright’s Invisible Cities”:

Seawright’s photographs of [sub-Saharan Africa] document these new urban spaces. The focus is not on the large monuments, landmarks, or signature buildings that would often be used to characterise a city. Nor does Seawright give us the bustling markets, chaotic street-life, or overcrowded transport systems that are so much a part and parcel of the visitors experience of urban African.  Instead he concentrates on the edges of these cities: the spaces through which the residents navigate their day to day lives. We get deserted lane-ways, apartment buildings, motor-way overpasses, roadside billboards and parking lots. His camera moves into interior spaces to show us hospital waiting rooms, non-descript offices, bars and classrooms. When people appear in the photographs they are either alone or in small groups. They seem to be in states of suspended animation: waiting, staring, sometimes sleeping. 

panopticomicon:

Foucault was a fan of MJ. Y’all heard it here first, folks.

panopticomicon:

Foucault was a fan of MJ. Y’all heard it here first, folks.

laurennmcc:

wolvensnothere:

Malcolm X on "Progress"

Always reblog Brother Malcolm

"They won’t even admit the knife is there."

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

queerdos:

Mahomie

queerdos:

Mahomie

queerdos:

Shoutback! Femme lovin’ banners made by Marita and I.

But it is also true that ghosts are never innocent: the unhallowed dead of the modern project drag in the pathos of their loss and the violence of the force that made them, their sheets and chains. To be haunted and to write from that location, to take on the condition of what you study, is not a methodology or a consciousness you can simply adopt or adapt as a set of rules or an identity; it produces its own insights and blindnesses. Following the ghosts is about making a contact that changes you and refashions the social relations in which you are located. It is about putting life back in where only a vague memory of a bare trace was visible to those who bothered to look. It is sometimes about writing ghost stories, stories that not only repair representational mistakes, but also strive to understand the conditions under which memory was produced in the first place, toward a countermemory, for the future.